All Kinds of Beautiful film campaign

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All Kinds of Beautiful is a film campaign aimed to help those who do not fit into Eurocentric beauty standards and are otherwise ignored by Mainstream Media. This includes all minority ethnic groups and also any other groups of people whereby there is a lot of stigma attached. For example, people with mental health issues or people with disabilities, or people who are overweight and judge themselves for being this way. All Kinds of Beautiful wants to promote every kind of human being, and to show that we are all the same.
I started this project because I myself have had an eating disorder due to weight issues and I also suffer from Borderline Personality Disorder. I always felt alienated from society and felt that I had to constantly live up to its beauty standards. Also, being part of the Muslim Asian community is something I am very proud of despite all the stigma attached to this group by the White British population. My goal is to make people feel better about themselves and to help others not to feel the way I did – like an outsider.

I hope that my project can help others if enough people can share it and connect with it. I hope that it can make others feel as though they are not in this alone and that they are truly beautiful. I hope that this project can help to put a dent in Eurocentric standards of beauty and make people think about other minority groups. And mostly I hope this project makes people realise that there truly are All Kinds of Beautiful in the world.

I am a big supporter of the #Oneisnotenough campaign because it ties in completely with All Kinds of Beautiful. I would like to represent BAMEs in my own campaign through spotlight interviews, giving people a chance to see through the eyes of of BAMEs themselves and to hear about their struggle. I want BAMEs to feel beautiful in the British society and I want them to feel like they belong.

Afshan x

Twitter: @Afshaann

To get involved in this wonderful project email afshansharif@hotmail.co.uk

If you would like to share your stories, experiences and opinions, or if you want to be featured on the ‘spotlight’ section email us at oneisnotenough16@gmail.com.

Bless x

#Oneisnotenough TEAM

Twitter: @1isnotenough

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“The world is your school and education is always around – don’t let your biases stop you from wanting to broaden your mind and learning about the many cultures that surround you”

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While you were growing up who did you see in the media that looked like you?
The one person who I’ve always looked up to and resonated with being a Latina, was the Mexican singer Selena. Of course, she unfortunately passed away when I was young but that didn’t mean that she wasn’t a prominent figure in my childhood. To this day I still listen to her music every day and her story was very inspiring. Her parents uprooted their entire life to devote themselves to helping Selena achieve success – and after a few hard times she eventually became one of the biggest names in the music industry. As a Latina, it’s so wonderful to hear people from our group achieving success because we hear of it so little compared to White Americans.
In school who did you learn about that looked like you or had similar experiences to you? 
Come to think of it…I don’t think I learned about many Hispanic people in my school. Its pretty sad to come to that conclusion but besides being in Spanish class (because it’s mandatory to take a foreign language in high school), I really didn’t hear much of my culture. What I learned, I learned through my family and my own research/experience.
Why do you think diversity and representation is important?
I believe that diversity and representation is important because we are all here. We all live on this planet together. So why focus on one group of people? The beauty of culture is that it can be shared. There is so much to learn about our environment, your specific group of people can only teach you so much. We need to open our minds and see the world through the many eyes that inhabit it, not just ours. I am a Latina, but my worldly lens differs from someone of the African-American descent and so forth. Which is why it’s so important to have representation and diversity in schools and in the media. There are children today watching television, thinking that the experiences of a white person is equal to the experiences that they will have growing up, which isn’t the case. We need to show them the characters in television shows that portray life experiences that a POC would have, because unfortunately, if your skin isn’t white you’re not going to have it as easy as everyone else. Show them they’re not alone.
Unfortunately, the media has an issue with this and it’s sad. We have movies that are clearly aimed towards a specific group but have their main character a completely different race. We have POC characters that don’t get the amount of screen time they deserve (Teen Wolf – Arden Cho), and we have POC characters dying for no reason except for entertainment.
Hopefully with time and education, this issue will diminish. But until then, it’s important to know that learning does not stop at school. The world is your school and education is always around – don’t let your biases stop you from wanting to broaden your mind and learning about the many cultures that surround you.

“We have to make sure our kids have the unalienable right to feel beautiful in their own skin, no matter what shade it is.”

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THE MEDIA – – >  

When you think back to the TV shows you watched as a kid, you’ll probably remember waking up early on a Saturday to watch your favourite cartoon; laughing hysterically over the practical joke your favourite character pulled pretty much every single episode. It’s unlikely that you’ll remember how you responded to the media, how you absorbed it and it absorbed you. Who was your favourite character on TV growing up, and what was it about them that made you aspire to be everything they were? For me, those characters were pretty, white slim girls that were probably head of the cheerleading squad. Even the misfits, who we were supposed to identify with, were white- at best, with glasses and a “geeky” persona to show that they were indeed, “different.” Speaking of, you may recall the cast of High School Musical breaking out into song “stick to the status quo.” Dig your old soundtrack out if you have to, but the film hardly broke the status quo; pretty white (with a dash of Latino) girl gets together with a pretty white (with a dash of chiseled abs) guy. And the black kids, Chad and Taylor? (yeah, I had to google their names,) they were forever the sidekicks, unlucky in love and with nothing to offer but a skill for spinning a basketball on one finger and a sassy one liner about weaves. How boring. How tragic. How boring and tragic that this same narrative is repeated, where the black kids are always left behind, and never represented as beautiful or worthy of love. This is the language that became part of my cultural dialect. White was clever. White was beautiful. And if you were anything but, you only had a choice of stereotypes A and B to choose from, and growing up racially ambiguous, I had no clue which box to tick.

THE CURRICULUM – – > 

The stereotypes of coloured people in the media are essentially just a continuation of the way they have been represented throughout history, and the state of the curriculum today doesn’t show any signs of straying off the beaten track. My two favourite subjects in school were History and English. In hindsight, I should have taken a comfort in a more uncontroversial subject like math; maybe then I wouldn’t have been so damn frustrated by everything that was handed to me on a comic sans font worksheet.

I’m actually horrified that I never studied a non-white writer in English Literature. Race was reduced to a theme that was being mediated to me through a white tinted lens, and that was extremely damaging. It makes me feel sick to think of the amount of times we were expected to write “In this novel, black people are represented as inferior.” History was one in the same, in which historical events are seen as a story of heroes and victims. In this sense, unsurprisingly, black people were always treated as the victims. Slavery was mentioned in whispers yes, and I always remember feeling uncomfortable as the whole class turned around to look at me in silent pity. It felt like I was being made to feel ashamed of my own heritage, my own history. I knew all about Abraham Lincoln, but knew nothing about the likes of Fredrick Douglass. I was taught that Carol Ann Duffy was the ultimate “feminist poet” but knew nothing of Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison, Gwendolyn Brooks, or the dozens of other black female writers I’ve come to know and love in my awakening to a more colourful world.

The world I learnt about in school was black and white, it was dangerous. The white curriculum that I and so many other ethnic minority students were dragged through epitomises what feminist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie called “the danger of a single story*,” that is, that having a secular perspective is dangerous because it cuts you off intellectually from the world around you, no matter how often you travel to Spain or like to eat Indian food. The proportion of ethnic minority pupils in state funded schools has increased dramatically since 2014, and in order for them to succeed in an inclusive learning environment, the curriculum should aim to teach a broader, universal history in an increasingly globalised world.

BEAUTY – – > 

In an increasingly globalised world, you would think that our society, with a constant overlapping of cultures, races, religions, we would have a greater, more compassionate understanding of each other. If you are not blessed with the gift of optimism however, you will notice how life is moving so fast that often, someone’s appearance is the most convenient way in which to form a judgement of someone. Picture this; there’s a black guy walking down the street, he has a bunch of other black guys behind him. You saw a sitcom on CBS once refer to such people as “homies” before. They laugh loudly and seem to constantly be pulling their trousers up. You assume they must be selling drugs, so you walk to the other side of the road. Of course, there’s nothing hereditary in the human psyche that causes you to make these assumptions, so where did you get them from? If you guessed the media, you get a gold star. Any other answer renders you incapable of understanding what I have to say next. Just how the media paints all black dudes such as my aforementioned imaginary friend with the same brush, the media likes to paint white people with a brush that just happens to make you prettier. Remember the public outcry that accused L’Oreal of lightening Beyoncé’s skin for an ad? How about more recently, when a Japanese advert for washing powder showed a black man being thrown into the washer and coming out as a whiter than white Asian? Or, if you want to bring colourism into it, the fact that the light skinned Zoe Saldana used black face to play Nina Simone? These examples all boil down to the fact that historically, particularly during the colonial period, there has been a white European hegemonic ideal (I know; who knew right.) Thus, the closer to white you are, in this instance, the better, prettier, or more attractive you are made to seem.

I am mixed race, light skinned, or hey, just feel free to stick whatever label you want to my forehead and be done with it. Anyway, from the day I was old enough to say “NO YOU CANNOT TOUCH MY HAIR,” my visual appearance has been fetishized by everyone from grandmas to perverts in nightclubs. A girl behind me in a queue for a club said my hair was “fascinating” so many times I wanted to drown her in a vat of Smirnoff ice. I’m the poster girl for school prospectuses, and my mother and father are commended on countless occasions for the “beautiful” brown children they’ve managed to produce. My best friend and I are told that we “really should” be a couple on the basis that we are both mixed race, which, in other situation, would be a completely bizarre concept to base a relationship on. I’m not ignorant towards the tribulations of dark skinned women, but I can’t speak for them either. White people fetishize light skinned people because they represent an exotic ideal, the aesthetics of being black in the absence of its sociological burdens.

WHAT WE CAN DO; 

You may have notice how I’ve used arrows at the end of every sub heading in this article. It’s not because I’m trying to be original or outrageously indie, but because it represents how all these things; the media, the curriculum, how we define beauty, are undeniably linked. And this is where my degree in English Lit comes in handy. In the first instance, the fact that these issues are all connected is good, because it means we can discuss them much easier. However, when issues like these are so integrated, it makes them difficult to break apart; instead we just end up with a cycle of what we’ve become used to as the norm, a concept that makes us so dizzy that we can’t see what’s right in front of us- and that is that something has GOT to change.

We have to make sure the next generation of BAME students have access to an educational environment that supports others’ and their own understandings of themselves and their history.

We have to make sure the media uses its power for good and that the images it produces are just as colourful as the realities of the people it is trying to portray.

We have to make sure our kids have the unalienable right to feel beautiful in their own skin, no matter what shade it is.

I don’t have all the answers, but together, by just talking to one another about race and diversity, we have the power to change the world we live in. If you’re not sure where to go from here, you can start by waking up- look at the world around you, educate yourselves, watch the news- and then notice what’s missing from it. And then start to wake everyone else up, until we make so much noise that the people at the top of the pyramid can no longer sleep in peace.

There’s a semi colon at the end of this subheading. People often don’t know what to do with semi colons, or where to put them in a sentence. But semi colons are used by an author when they could have finished a sentence with a full stop, but have chosen not to. So don’t let this be the end of your story, because we’re not even halfway through it yet.

*

Did you relate to this? Do you have any questions? If so, write them in the comment section below- we would love to hear from you 🙂

If you would like to share your stories, experiences and opinions email us at oneisnotenough16@gmail.com.

Bless x

#Oneisnotenough TEAM

Twitter: @1isnotenough

“Many white people generally tend to avoid racial issues as they will never have to experience them”

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While you were growing up who did you see in the media that looked like you?
Growing up, there seemed to be much more black people in the media, especially within television programmes such as ‘One on One’, ‘My Wife and Kids’, ‘Fresh Prince of Bel Air’ and ‘Desmonds’.  I found many of these programmes very identifiable, especially Fresh Prince of Bel Air. Philip and Carlton Banks were both well educated black individuals that aspired to enter competitive professions and educational institutions, which is something that I also endeavoured. Many of the episodes covering issues concerning black people being minority within these professions and educational institutions still stand today and for me, it’s encouraging to have been able to have watched these episodes at a younger age and grow up knowing that it’s not only faces these issues. Most of these programmes addressed  discriminatory issues that many black people faced at the time concerning aspects such as employment, education and other life choices. In my opinion, there was a decline in many television programmes that catered towards black people simply because it did not entertain or relate to the predominantly white audience and at times, may have made them feel uncomfortable as many white people generally tend to avoid racial issues as they will never have to experience them. Though, it’s a shame that my children may not be able to view  television programmes or any type of black role model in the media to help address racial issues that  will undoubtedly still exist in the next 10-20 years.
 
In school who did you learn about that looked like you or had similar experiences to you? 
In school, there wasn’t much representation of black people, although, I remember being told about a former pupil who attended my secondary school. Baroness Valerie Amos was the first black deputy head girl in my school, she went to have a become successful career and became the first female black head of a UK university last year. She was always a figure in our secondary school to look up to.
Why do you think diversity and representation is important?
Diversity will always be important. It reminds us that people of every race has the potential to succeed in any profession and subject of study, hence the lack of diversity reflects the lack of oppourtunites given to ethnic minorities. Within the UK’s top universities, there seems to be a disgustingly low percentage of black people, and the lack of representation of my race is what makes it hard for a lot of black people to cope with day-to-day life due to the mild racism that we frequently face*. Though, one black person representing our race is better than none, because it is important to show the other races that we are capable of attaining the same things they can and it gives hope that we will grow in number in the years to come. Within the media, there is a need for diversity and representation of the black race to increase as it is important to inform the British public that we still face the same issues that were occurring 20 years ago and establish the fact that everyday is a day closer to racial equality, whether they like it or not.
 *e.g. This was addressed in the #ITooAmOxford & #ITooAmCambridge- click here for more info.

From I, Too, Am Cambridge 

“It may be useful in educating children about their history rather than having a dominant narrative in textbooks (of colonisers vs the colonised)”

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While you were growing up who did you see in the media that looked like you?
Richard Blackwood, Bradley from s club 7 and black male actors
In school who did you learn about that looked like you or had similar experiences to you? 
No one except in black history month, mostly historical figures eg. Olaudah Equiano

‘Olaudah Equiano was a prominent African in London, a freed slave who supported the British movement to end the slave trade’

Why do you think diversity and representation is important? 
I think it helps children to have role models that are feasibly attainable eg. A first female president, something which some girls may think is unlikely and not worth pursuing. Also it may be useful in educating children about their history rather than having a dominant narrative in textbooks (of colonisers vs the colonised)

“It was generally just the people they expected us to know i.e Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela. Hardly any women.”

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While you were growing up who did you see in the media that looked like you?

Well i was born in Uganda and looking back on it now, the popular soaps that everyone watched were Spanish, so they had European actors speaking Spanish with subtitles at the bottom. At the time i didn’t think anything of it because there were other shows with people that looked/spoke like me. But coming to the UK, i found that there was hardly any black people in the media ,especially black women. But because of this i found myself drawn more to ‘black tv programmes’ like Trouble which used to have Moesha, My Wife and Kids and so much more.
 
In school who did you learn about that looked like you or had similar experiences to you? 
In school i don’t really remember learning about any specific people that looked liked me, well no one that stand out. It was generally just the people they expected us to know i.e Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela. Hardly any women once again.
Why do you think diversity and representation is important?
Diversity and representation is very important, i think now more than ever. Young people especially, should be able to see that no matter what ethnicity they are, that they can see people that look like them, speak like them and maybe also have had to experience the same hardships they’ve been through. This should tie into all things, whether it be in their day to day lives, or through the media. Young people should also be able to study on a deeper understanding about their history and the people that have played involvement in getting them to wherever they.

“Our generation is so much better than older generations, we are more accepting of ‘different’ people”

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While you were growing up who did you see in the media that looked like you?

It was never something that I thought about growing up but looking back there really was no female asian that I saw in any kind of media. Which is sad and disappointing! I understand there could be various reasons as to why that might be the case because not many asian girls aspire to be actresses etc. But sometimes I think it’s because there is no one us asians can aspire to be like. There are no asian supermodels, hardly any really successful asian actresses or asian singers so who do we aspire to be like? I always grew up thinking that it would be impossible to be a really famous actress or singer or something along those lines just because we aren’t the norm in the society we live in. I wish it wasn’t like that. I was told growing up that working in those kind of industries that i wouldn’t do well because of the colour of my skin so I guess that’s why most of us end up following the educational routes where your grades matter more than your looks.

I also think the Asian characters shown in media follow these ‘negative’ stereotypes, they’re often seen as the nerd in movies or the Asians are the doctors. For example in Angus, thongs and perfect snogging the Asian girl that was the weird one who found it harder to get the guys. Other examples I can name are pitch perfect and mean girls. The majority of the time i do find it quite funny but sometimes i’m like why can’t the Asian person be normal and be the main gal for once. Even the black people are often portrayed as more aggressive but yet the white people are always the loveable characters that everyone wants to be.
I’m not saying that a white person can’t be my role model but it would be great to see an Asian person doing just as well and be able to relate to them.

 

The thing that sucks the most is that growing up I always thought you had to be white to be pretty and now i know that is ridiculous but it’s the sad truth! But I love that there are now more role models of other ethnicities because it gives me hope and someone to look up to that has done well despite the colour of their skin. Like look at Beyonce and Rihanna, they both are just so fab.


In school who did you learn about that looked like you or had similar experiences to you?

Again, honestly no one that I can remember from the top of my head. Where are all the asian poets and book writers at? Where is all the asian history at? To be honest I only did history up until year 9 so i can’t really argue that point. I think it would have been great for us to learn about the history of other countries that’s not Britain.



Why do you think diversity and representation is important? 


I think diversity and representation makes people so much more open minded. WE SHOULD REPRESENT EVERYONE. If you teach kids from a young age about religion, race, sexuality etc. It will give them a better understanding and they can form their own opinions and views from what they learn rather than the views inflicted on them by society. I’m not going to say it will get rid of discrimination but I think it will help. It will give the kids that have no idea about the outside world what it really is like to be in other people’s situations. Till this day I will never understand why people discriminate. Like what joy do you get out of it?!?! What joy do you get telling a person who isn’t white to leave your country?! If you were educated you would know that you don’t own this planet (soz if you didn’t know you were just a product of evolution that has a particular colour of skin) and you would know that if it wasn’t for the action of your ‘own people’, a lot of people would have stayed where they came from.

I will never understand why people discriminate against those who are bisexual or homosexual – why does it matter who you fancy?!?!?! Really what difference does it make! We all just want to be happy! In school i think these issues aren’t spoken about because these topics are taboo subjects – so if we know they are taboo why don’t we talk about them more. I love talking to my friends about race and stuff because it gives me a better understanding of other people. Our generation is so much better than older generations, we are more accepting of ‘different’ people but there is still that minority that need to learn that their skin colour does not in any way make them better than anyone else. I don’t know if racism will ever go away because i think there will always be the minority who will discriminate and people who don’t mix with other ethnicities without realising but school and media are a great way of representing the ethnic minorities to help change views.

When minority groups are not represented, in a way they begin to feel isolated. I was watching a coming out video of a famous youtuber where we he was talking about how he came out and the struggles. Reading through the comments section honestly made me tear up there were so many young people who felt like they were the only one struggling with coming out, they felt isolated and so many of them had suicidal thoughts. The comments section was a community where they were all able to relate to one another, they had gone through the same struggle but videos of their role models made them feel more comfortable and happy – it broke my heart. It goes to show how representation is so important because we all rely on knowing we’re not the only one and I honestly think it can help the mental health of so many people to know they’re not alone.

We live in a great world with so many different people – different races, cultures, religions – why not learn about them? It’s great and so interesting! So many great stories just being lost because not everyone is equally represented. It’s really all about educating people! School and media are things that help to shape people so why not use it?

Did you relate to this? Do you have any questions? If so, write them in the comment section below- we would love to hear from you 🙂

If you would like to share your stories, experiences and opinions email us at oneisnotenough16@gmail.com.

Bless x

#Oneisnotenough TEAM

Twitter: @1isnotenough

“In school there really was a lack of conversation about experiences of people of different races”

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While you were growing up who did you see in the media that looked like you?
As a child, I enjoyed listening to R&B music, and in those music videos the majority of artists or back up dancers were black. I feel like a lot of children’s television shows tried to have at least one black character so there was always somebody there representing the race. In particular, That’s so Raven was good in terms of having someone in the media that was like me.
 
In school who did you learn about that looked like you or had similar experiences to you?
In schools, I feel like there really was a lack of conversation about experiences of people of different races. Other than covering the slave trade in history I feel like subjects that had the opportunity to discuss racial diversity didn’t really do so. For example, in PSHE, we would spend about 3 years discussing safe sex and not taking cannabis, but part of those 3 years could have been used to discuss those who are similar to me, and others, in terms of race and so on.

Could be a great tool in having race discussions in school 

Why do you think diversity and representation is important? 
I think, in particular, with young children, the lack of diversity and representation can lead to ethnic minorities having a Eurocentric view of beauty and think their inadequate just because of their skin tone, by having representation minority children can see that they aren’t “weird” but are beautiful regardless of their skin tone. Having representation in the media allows us to identify with someone and embrace ourselves from a young age.
Diversity is also important in limiting ignorant views. Because of the general lack of representation, I do think that in some cases Caucasian people are ignorant to the issues ethnic minorities face. Representation will bring about understanding. If discussions about racial equality, diversity and representation are put into the school curriculum at a younger age, there will be a general greater understanding.
Without representation, large groups of people go without their voices being heard. That’s not fair on them and by having a more diverse media, people can find someone to identify with, and feel like their voices matter.

“Cultural diversity from a young age is absolutely vital”

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As somebody who enjoyed writing, journalism seemed like the obvious option and so I decided that I needed a figure within my post to look up to. I would sit in front of the television watching Emily Maitilis on the BBC news at about five am every day, dedication at its finest. There was even an opportunity whereby I was able to go to the BBC studio and watch the news live, Maitilis was there and I became even more inspired. I just saw an incredibly talented woman whom I wanted to be like one day. The mind of a child does not wander too far and delve too deep into things but growing up I only recall there being one newscaster that looked like me and that was Trevor Mcdonald on the channel four news. I did not really see it as a problem, rather I observed that the media did lack colour particularly within the academic sector.

Being a child schooling in south east London, my class and school were pretty diverse. There were about eleven of us that were not English and so I did not really feel all that different. Though the curriculum did not specifically focus upon black history, every October there was a celebration of Black History and bodies within the school such as after school clubs did their best to teach on the importance of Black History Month, calling upon iconic black figures such as Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela. One thing I remember most distinctly is my teacher in year three giving me a book on the most famous people in history. Of course there was Adolf Hitler, the lunatic that wished to create a master race but within these pages also lay a silent hero: Rosa Lee Parks. I was incredibly in awe of and inspired by Ms Parks and I truly admired her assertion and her defiance to stand up for what she believed in regardless of the consequences. I thought that people like her were brave and ought to be remembered and so when I was given the opportunity to initiate a name for the building that was to be opened within our school, I suggested that it was called the ‘Rosa Parks’ building. The school opted for Mary Seacole building, which was close enough.

It was when I moved away from culturally diverse London and into Essex that I truly began to stand out. Within the entire school, there were only about four black children, myself included. October came and went and there was no mention of Black History Month during the two years that I was there for. Though I had very strong values and a good sense of who I was as a black child, others may not. I am eternally grateful for having gone to my first primary school because they embedded into the children that every person and every race was important. Cultural diversity from a young age is absolutely vital because children need to know that we are not all the same and being different is not something that ought to be frowned upon but rather understood and embraced. I feel that cultural diversity within the media is slowly evolving but there is still a lack of diversity within academia. For instance, young people that aspire to be politicians are given a false message that in order to be one you must be white, between the ages of forty and sixty and you would have to have gone to the Oxbridge universities. This should not be the image to look up to. Where you can work towards going to an Oxbridge university, you should not feel that your colour is a hindrance to apply for certain posts. This needs to change.

 

“If it was not during Black History Month, I didn’t learn about anyone that looked like me”

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While you were growing up who did you see in the media that looked like you?
I grew up in South East London which is very culturally diverse and as far as I remember growing up, the person I can think of who resembled me in the media was Kelly Rowland. At the time, I was a big fan of the Destiny’s Child and Kelly Rowland was the only dark skinned black woman I would see on TV and even aspire to look like when growing up.
In school who did you learn about that looked like you or had similar experiences to you? 
In primary school, if it was not during Black History Month, I didn’t learn about anyone that looked like me but then when I moved to Ghana I started learning about Ghanaian history so it was more relevant to me personally. I think that the fact that I lived in Africa for 6 years ( 2 years in Ghana and 4 years in the Republic of Benin) made me learn more about people that were more like me and had similar experiences to me, and I don’t know if I would have been exposed to such information if I had stayed in the UK for most of my secondary school life.
Why do you think diversity and representation is important? 
I think diversity and representation is important because we live in a world where we are all different, we all come from different places in the world and I think it is important to acknowledge that. Refusing to be diverse is in my opinion refusing to accept what the world is like. Representation is even more important I believe because even if we are all aware of diversity, it is not accurately shown and that is in my opinion a shame.

Did you relate to this? Do you have any questions? If so, write them in the comment section below- we would love to hear from you 🙂

If you would like to share your stories, experiences and opinions email us at oneisnotenough16@gmail.com.

Bless x

#Oneisnotenough TEAM

Twitter: @1isnotenough